Tag Archives: Fundamentals

Basketball Fundamentals For Beginners

Basketball
by Mr ATM

The work of the basketball coach will be made more effective if he keeps charts of each game. This is one of the basketball fundamentals. Rebound charts and miscellaneous charts are discussed in this article.

Rebound Charts
Rebound charts provide the following information:

1. Number of offensive and defensive rebounds by each team.
2. Number of offensive and defensive rebounds by each individual.

Insufficient offensive or defensive rebounds can suggest areas of rebounding work in practice. If the number of defensive rebounds is not in close proximity to the number of missed shots by the opponents, stress should be placed on block-outs and other defensive rebounding techniques.

The reverse would be true if a team is falling down on the offensive boards. The knowledge of which players on a team are getting the most rebounds can suggest individuals who need additional work in this area and can act as an incentive to future rebounding performances by allowing competition among individuals on the team.

An accurate knowledge of the leading rebounders on the opposing team may suggest play direction. For example, if the left forward on the opponents is their best rebounder, initiating plays in his defensive area may result in shots being taken while he is out on the floor and away from the board.

Keeping the Rebound Chart
Rebounds may be recorded on the same composite chart with shots and mistakes. Simply writing the number of the rebounder in the appropriate offensive or defensive rebounding column is sufficient.

Miscellaneous Charts
One of the important basketball fundamentals is to make sure you have all essential charts.A number of other types of charts are used by many coaches. Among them are:

1. Player Combination Charts. This chart records each combination of players throughout the game, the time played by each player and combination, and gives a view as to the combination of players achieving the best results. When a player enters the game, his initial is placed on the line under the name of the player he is replacing along with the score and time remaining.

2. Officiating Charts. Recording the type o£ officiating calls made by each official can suggest the type o£ game to be played. If blocking calls are excessive, players can be instructed to drive a great deal. On the other hand, if charging calls predominate, defensive players can be instructed to jump freely in front of drivers. Few fouls called under the basket may indicate a rougher type of rebounding play.

3. Jump-ball Charts. An accurate record of jump-ball situations may be obtained by the use of this chart. The chart records the players involved in the jump situation, who controls the tap, and who gains ball possession. The numbers of the players jumping are recorded. If your player gets control of the tap at the height of the ball toss, a plus is recorded. If he does not get the tap, a minus is recorded. A plus or minus is again used to chart the team that gains ball possession.

4. Offensive Options. Many teams keep charts that indicate play options that result in shots and scoring and evaluate the effectiveness of their offensive plays on these results.

5. Defensive Mistakes. A record of mistakes made both by the team defense and by individual defensive players is useful and can aid in determining areas needed for work in practice. The type of mistakes to be charted will depend on the type of team defense played and must be ascertained by the individual coach.

6. Center-line Advancement. These charts record the number of times ball possession is gained in backcourt but the ball is lost before crossing the center-line. Added information may be provided by charting the number of times the offense advances the ball into front-court and fails to obtain a shot.

General Suggestions
1. Make a thorough study of the information desired and arrive at a sound program of charting to obtain this information.
2. Obtain interested personnel and train them in accurate charting techniques.
3. Study the charts diligently after each game and make the results available to the entire squad.
4. Keep cumulative statistics on all charts and file charts for future reference.

Good basketball fundamentals means effective charting will improve the performance of the team.

Like To Know How To Get The Edge In Beginner Basketball?
Find All The Techniques At: http://www.beginnerbasketball.net

Fundamentals For the Baseball Catcher

The position of the baseball catcher in a baseball team is a very important one. On thrown balls to his right, the catcher should slide the right foot toward 1st base and close with the left. On thrown balls to the left, it’s slide left, close right. When teaching the catcher these two steps, the coach or manager should toss the ball on one side then the other.

Once the move seems to be mastered, it should be pointed out that it takes only a second for a pitched ball to reach the plate. This means the slide-close to right and left must be done quickly and smoothly. It would be well then for the manager to back off about 60 feet and deliberately throw the ball to left and right of the catcher and to throw it fairly fast.

Shifting the feet enables the catcher to both catch the ball and throw. With runners on base, the proper shift becomes more important than ever. Assume the batter is right-handed and the pitch is directly over the plate. What’s the fastest foot-move one can make? Simple. Leave the right foot where it is in the Receiving Position, step forward left and throw. (In the Receiving Position, your feet are wide apart, your tail low. Your glove hand makes the target. The bare hand is loose, with the thumb tucked under the other fingers.)

Assume you have the same situation with the pitch going to the right, or “outside”. Step right with the right foot. Instead of closing left, step diagonally right and forward with the left foot and throw.

On pitches that are “inside” to the right-handed hitter, the baseball catcher steps left for the catch and instead of closing right, steps diagonally right with the right foot, plants it, steps left and throws. It’s to-the-left, to-the-right, forward-and-throw. If the pitch is far inside, causing the batter to jump back, a slight variation will help. Step left, bring the right foot left and plant it directly in back of the left, step forward with the left foot and throw. Use this step, too, if the runner is going from 2nd to 3rd, but throw in back of the batter if he’s in the way.

For left hand hitters:
on outside pitches-step left, bring the right foot in back of the left, plant it, step forward left and throw. On inside pitches-step right, hop diagonally left and forward on the right foot, step forward left and throw. If the catcher wants to throw to 1st with a left hand hitter at the dish, he can throw behind the batter on inside pitches, from in front on outside pitches.

If a manager has two or three catchers on the squad, he can drill them as follows:
have the catchers line up side-by-side with plenty of room between each catcher. Have them face the coach and assume the Receiving Position. The coach can yell out the pitch, then “shift”, the signal for the catchers to go through the steps. “All right boys” the manager, or coach could say. “It’s a right-hand hitter. Get ready for the pitch. Here it comes, low and inside . . . Ready? SHIFT!”

He can repeat that line with all the variations. The teacher cannot spend too much time on this exercise. If a boy is having trouble with the steps, his Dad can help him in the back yard, cellar or attic.

After the Receiving Position has been taught, it’s time to think about working behind the plate.

Learn Everything You Need To Know About Baseball Catching Fast!
Visit:http://www.baseball-training.org/index.php

Trade Show Exhibits Fundamentals

You can maximize the impact of your trade show exhibits by ensuring the graphics and designs meet your company’s marketing and budget needs. Learn how to effectively create unique and specific ideas for your exhibit and configure all graphics and designs to fit your booth. Whether you are experienced in shows or a novice, there are four guideline fundamentals that are imperative in order to make your event a fabulous success:

Know the reason that you are in the show, be aware of the attendees at the show, and understand how to attract the attention of prospects to your booth.
Know exactly how to generate sales once your prospects are visiting your booth
These fundamentals are the most sensible and effective ways to make your booth work.

Once you have clarity on why you are exhibiting in a show and what the companies objectives are, then you can move forward. That is when you can gather your team member’s together and set goals for the trade show exhibits as well as setting up the graphics and maintaining the level of attraction you need to bring the most attention to your exhibit.

When you are gathering members to help you in the booth, make sure they are qualified, well trained, and educated. Once people are inside your booth, and then give hands-on descriptions and presentations of your company’s products. This will make a lasting impression on your potential prospects.

With trade show exhibits your main objective is to attract key prospects to your booth that will turn into revenue for your company. There are a variety of ways to do this. Coordinating your message, logo, and graphics in your advertising, signage, and displays brands your company and helps establish credibility before you say a word.

You can send out fliers or emails to your potential consumers and fill them in on the date, time, and location of the event. This is an inexpensive element that will certainly pay for itself. You also can grab everyone’s attention with bold event display graphics in your banners and a sign that are dramatic and have a focused message that creates instant attention.

Modern technologies can dramatically help your trade show exhibits with an interactive website, 3D video imagery, holographic displays, and more. Retractable banners also help to delineate your area. Another good idea to draw prospective clients to your booth is planning a giveaway or door prize; this would be effective in keeping the potential customers inside your booth longer as well.

Trade show exhibits are becoming more and more popular every year. These shows help consumers find contacts and perhaps even new vendors, and having an effective booth may help you become one too. You also want to be sure you have specific strategies in closing sales with these prospects.

This is a key element in addition to gaining their attention and luring them to your booth. It wouldn’t hurt for you and your team members to practice this when the time is closer to the events opening. Implementing these fundamentals with a professional and courteous attitude is going to be the key to a successful and prosperous exhibit.

Signate is an expert in trade show exhibits , trade show exhibits and trade show exhibits

Fundamentals For the Baseball Catcher

The position of the baseball catcher in a baseball team is a very important one. On thrown balls to his right, the catcher should slide the right foot toward 1st base and close with the left. On thrown balls to the left, it’s slide left, close right. When teaching the catcher these two steps, the coach or manager should toss the ball on one side then the other.

Once the move seems to be mastered, it should be pointed out that it takes only a second for a pitched ball to reach the plate. This means the slide-close to right and left must be done quickly and smoothly. It would be well then for the manager to back off about 60 feet and deliberately throw the ball to left and right of the catcher and to throw it fairly fast.

Shifting the feet enables the catcher to both catch the ball and throw. With runners on base, the proper shift becomes more important than ever. Assume the batter is right-handed and the pitch is directly over the plate. What’s the fastest foot-move one can make? Simple. Leave the right foot where it is in the Receiving Position, step forward left and throw. (In the Receiving Position, your feet are wide apart, your tail low. Your glove hand makes the target. The bare hand is loose, with the thumb tucked under the other fingers.)

Assume you have the same situation with the pitch going to the right, or “outside”. Step right with the right foot. Instead of closing left, step diagonally right and forward with the left foot and throw.

On pitches that are “inside” to the right-handed hitter, the baseball catcher steps left for the catch and instead of closing right, steps diagonally right with the right foot, plants it, steps left and throws.

It’s to-the-left, to-the-right, forward-and-throw. If the pitch is far inside, causing the batter to jump back, a slight variation will help. Step left, bring the right foot left and plant it directly in back of the left, step forward with the left foot and throw. Use this step, too, if the runner is going from 2nd to 3rd, but throw in back of the batter if he’s in the way.

For left hand hitters:
on outside pitches-step left, bring the right foot in back of the left, plant it, step forward left and throw. On inside pitches-step right, hop diagonally left and forward on the right foot, step forward left and throw. If the catcher wants to throw to 1st with a left hand hitter at the dish, he can throw behind the batter on inside pitches, from in front on outside pitches.

If a manager has two or three catchers on the squad, he can drill them as follows:
have the catchers line up side-by-side with plenty of room between each catcher. Have them face the coach and assume the Receiving Position. The coach can yell out the pitch, then “shift”, the signal for the catchers to go through the steps. “All right boys” the manager, or coach could say. “It’s a right-hand hitter. Get ready for the pitch. Here it comes, low and inside . . . Ready? SHIFT!”

He can repeat that line with all the variations. The teacher cannot spend too much time on this exercise. If a boy is having trouble with the steps, his Dad can help him in the back yard, cellar or attic.

After the Receiving Position has been taught, it’s time to think about working behind the plate.

Learn Everything You Need To Know About Baseball Catching Fast!
Visit:http://www.baseball-training.org/index.php

Basketball Fundamentals For Beginners

The work of the basketball coach will be made more effective if he keeps charts of each game. This is one of the basketball fundamentals. Rebound charts and miscellaneous charts are discussed in this article.

Rebound Charts
Rebound charts provide the following information:

1. Number of offensive and defensive rebounds by each team.
2. Number of offensive and defensive rebounds by each individual.

Insufficient offensive or defensive rebounds can suggest areas of rebounding work in practice. If the number of defensive rebounds is not in close proximity to the number of missed shots by the opponents, stress should be placed on block-outs and other defensive rebounding techniques.

The reverse would be true if a team is falling down on the offensive boards. The knowledge of which players on a team are getting the most rebounds can suggest individuals who need additional work in this area and can act as an incentive to future rebounding performances by allowing competition among individuals on the team.

An accurate knowledge of the leading rebounders on the opposing team may suggest play direction. For example, if the left forward on the opponents is their best rebounder, initiating plays in his defensive area may result in shots being taken while he is out on the floor and away from the board.

Keeping the Rebound Chart
Rebounds may be recorded on the same composite chart with shots and mistakes. Simply writing the number of the rebounder in the appropriate offensive or defensive rebounding column is sufficient.

Miscellaneous Charts
One of the important basketball fundamentals is to make sure you have all essential charts.A number of other types of charts are used by many coaches.

Among them are:

1. Player Combination Charts. This chart records each combination of players throughout the game, the time played by each player and combination, and gives a view as to the combination of players achieving the best results. When a player enters the game, his initial is placed on the line under the name of the player he is replacing along with the score and time remaining.

2. Officiating Charts. Recording the type o£ officiating calls made by each official can suggest the type o£ game to be played. If blocking calls are excessive, players can be instructed to drive a great deal. On the other hand, if charging calls predominate, defensive players can be instructed to jump freely in front of drivers. Few fouls called under the basket may indicate a rougher type of rebounding play.

3. Jump-ball Charts. An accurate record of jump-ball situations may be obtained by the use of this chart. The chart records the players involved in the jump situation, who controls the tap, and who gains ball possession. The numbers of the players jumping are recorded. If your player gets control of the tap at the height of the ball toss, a plus is recorded. If he does not get the tap, a minus is recorded. A plus or minus is again used to chart the team that gains ball possession.

4. Offensive Options. Many teams keep charts that indicate play options that result in shots and scoring and evaluate the effectiveness of their offensive plays on these results.

5. Defensive Mistakes. A record of mistakes made both by the team defense and by individual defensive players is useful and can aid in determining areas needed for work in practice. The type of mistakes to be charted will depend on the type of team defense played and must be ascertained by the individual coach.

6. Center-line Advancement. These charts record the number of times ball possession is gained in backcourt but the ball is lost before crossing the center-line. Added information may be provided by charting the number of times the offense advances the ball into front-court and fails to obtain a shot.

General Suggestions
1. Make a thorough study of the information desired and arrive at a sound program of charting to obtain this information.
2. Obtain interested personnel and train them in accurate charting techniques.
3. Study the charts diligently after each game and make the results available to the entire squad.
4. Keep cumulative statistics on all charts and file charts for future reference.

Good basketball fundamentals means effective charting will improve the performance of the team.

Like To Know How To Get The Edge In Beginner Basketball?
Find All The Techniques At: http://www.beginnerbasketball.net