Tag Archives: Consider

Buick Used cars- Buick Enclave Consider One of the Best Midsize Sport Utility Vehicles Anywhere

Buick used cars like the Buick Enclave is considered one of the best midsize SUV’s on the used market today. The Enclave has been compared with some of the best luxury SUV’s out there because of how comfortable and quite the ride is.  The Enclave can seat comfortably 8 people and has been suggested by others test driving it that it drives more like a car than a SUV.

Buick Enclave used cars come in three different packages. The most basic package is the CX, you can upgrade that to the CXL and if you want their best package then the CXL2 is their best one.

Buick used cars have always had a great safety record but the Enclave is absolutely amazing. It has earned a five star crash test rating for front and side impacts; it also got a four start rating for protection against any type of rollover that could occur. Some of the features that the Buick Enclave has to offer are anti lock brakes on all four wheels, OnStar, traction control and driver and passenger air bags. Also there is an option for navigation for rear-view camera.

The interior for the Enclave is very spacious; it provides space and room for eight people to sit comfortably. The second row can come in two or three seats; the two seat option comes in captain chairs making it even more comfortable. The two seats in front come with heating and if you upgrade to the CXL2, you also get cooling. The Enclave is also equipped with three different climate zones and adjustable steering.

These are just a few things to consider when looking at used cars in the midsize sport utility vehicle market. The Buick Enclave is one of the best in its field and is known to be very reliable on the road. 

Sean Traynor writes helpful tips in buying vehicles.  

To Hit the Golf Ball Better and Higher – Consider Reducing the Loft of Your Golf Clubs

At first sight this may seem to be a strange paradox; after all, in order to hit the ball higher the obvious thing to do outside of changing the golf swing would be to increase the loft, not decrease it. This may be the accepted wisdom of “usual” golf advice, but is it necessarily correct?
 
Let me explain.
 
When set correctly in preparation to strike the golf ball, the leading edge of all irons sits off the ground; the extent to which it does depends on the club, with the leading edge of the more lofted clubs sitting more off the ground than those with less loft.
 
The amount by which the leading edge is off the ground is the sole angle of the golf club, commonly known as “bounce”, so the sand wedge, for example, will have more bounce than, say, a six iron. As a comparison, the former may have 12 degrees of bounce against 5 degrees with the latter.
 
Wedges – particularly sand wedges – tend to be a law unto themselves and are, therefore, outside the scope of this article which focuses on the rest of the irons.
 
There may be a number of reasons for failing to get the ball airborne – de-lofting the club at impact for example – but one of the main causes is hitting the ball “thin”.
 
Everyone has at some point in their golfing life thinned a shot so badly that it skids along the ground, sending an unpleasant wave of stinging vibration up the shaft and into the hands; but does anyone ever really consider what a thin shot is? It may seem obvious but I shall say it anyway, and that is that a thinned shot occurs when the golfer strikes the ball with the leading edge of the club.
 
Interestingly enough, many golfers that are prone to thinning their shots will instinctively de-loft the club to avoid the “leading-edge strike”, only to find that they still fail to get the desired ball-flight for reasons that are self-evident.
 
The “stinging” shot described above is, of course, an obvious example of hitting the ball thin, but what about the times when the vibration is not there, the golfer has not de-lofted the club but the flight of the ball is still lower than expected? This is still likely to be a consequence of “not getting all of the ball” which is what a marginally thinned shot is.
 
The ultimate aim is to strike the ball with the “sweet-spot” of the club because by doing so the golfer will achieve the optimum ball-flight, direction and distance assuming all other things – such as swing path, for example – are equal. The location of the sweet-spot may vary slightly from one set of irons to another but as a general rule is situated marginally towards the heel of the club and a little below halfway up the face; the sweet spot is never on the leading edge!
 
Taking all of the above into account, it may help to form a picture in our minds of the position of the leading edge of the club relative to the ball at the precise moment of impact of a slightly thinned shot. Having done so, mentally “freeze” the club in that position (with the leading edge just touching the bottom of the ball) and then, whilst it is there, bend the leading edge downwards so that it and the ball are no longer in contact. Having now moved the leading edge “out of the way”, re-start the golf club to complete the strike and you should “see” that it is now the club-face that hits the ball.
 
It follows, therefore, that for someone who is prone to thinning the ball and as a consequence fails to get it airborne, moving the leading edge “out of the way” by bending it downwards could help them to get the club face on the ball, thereby taking advantage of the available loft.
 
As with many things connected with golf club specification, however, the inter-relationship which exists between all aspects of the club means that moving the leading edge “out of the way” will impact on something else and in this case it is the loft. Bending the leading edge downwards – thereby reducing the distance between it and the ground (the sole angle or bounce) – will reduce the loft. Looking at it another way, reducing the loft of the club could help the “perpetual thinner” by getting the leading edge “out of the way” at the moment of impact. In any event, the effect on the loft is not great, given that a one degree reduction in bounce roughly equates to the same reduction in loft. Putting this into context, a seven iron, say, has a loft of around thirty-five degrees with about six degrees of bounce. Reducing the bounce by one degree (and I would not recommend much more – two degrees at a push, perhaps) will result in a new loft angle of thirty-four degrees.
 
In the right circumstances the trade-off is more than worth it because the better quality of strike can be such that the golfer’s game can improve beyond recognition without the need to change the golf swing.

Steve’s mission is to share the more “unusual” golf advice with his readers and has put together a complimentary report containing new and sometimes radical ideas and concepts that could take your game to a new level quickly and permanently. To access it instantly, please visit http://www.golfadvicedetective.com

Buick Used cars- Buick Enclave Consider One of the Best Midsize Sport Utility Vehicles Anywhere

Buick used cars like the Buick Enclave is considered one of the best midsize SUV’s on the used market today. The Enclave has been compared with some of the best luxury SUV’s out there because of how comfortable and quite the ride is.  The Enclave can seat comfortably 8 people and has been suggested by others test driving it that it drives more like a car than a SUV.

Buick Enclave used cars come in three different packages. The most basic package is the CX, you can upgrade that to the CXL and if you want their best package then the CXL2 is their best one.

Buick used cars have always had a great safety record but the Enclave is absolutely amazing. It has earned a five star crash test rating for front and side impacts; it also got a four start rating for protection against any type of rollover that could occur. Some of the features that the Buick Enclave has to offer are anti lock brakes on all four wheels, OnStar, traction control and driver and passenger air bags. Also there is an option for navigation for rear-view camera.

The interior for the Enclave is very spacious; it provides space and room for eight people to sit comfortably. The second row can come in two or three seats; the two seat option comes in captain chairs making it even more comfortable. The two seats in front come with heating and if you upgrade to the CXL2, you also get cooling. The Enclave is also equipped with three different climate zones and adjustable steering.

These are just a few things to consider when looking at used cars in the midsize sport utility vehicle market. The Buick Enclave is one of the best in its field and is known to be very reliable on the road. 

Sean Traynor writes helpful tips in buying vehicles.  

To Hit the Golf Ball Better and Higher – Consider Reducing the Loft of Your Golf Clubs

At first sight this may seem to be a strange paradox; after all, in order to hit the ball higher the obvious thing to do outside of changing the golf swing would be to increase the loft, not decrease it. This may be the accepted wisdom of “usual” golf advice, but is it necessarily correct?
 
Let me explain.
 
When set correctly in preparation to strike the golf ball, the leading edge of all irons sits off the ground; the extent to which it does depends on the club, with the leading edge of the more lofted clubs sitting more off the ground than those with less loft.
 
The amount by which the leading edge is off the ground is the sole angle of the golf club, commonly known as “bounce”, so the sand wedge, for example, will have more bounce than, say, a six iron. As a comparison, the former may have 12 degrees of bounce against 5 degrees with the latter.
 
Wedges – particularly sand wedges – tend to be a law unto themselves and are, therefore, outside the scope of this article which focuses on the rest of the irons.
 
There may be a number of reasons for failing to get the ball airborne – de-lofting the club at impact for example – but one of the main causes is hitting the ball “thin”.
 
Everyone has at some point in their golfing life thinned a shot so badly that it skids along the ground, sending an unpleasant wave of stinging vibration up the shaft and into the hands; but does anyone ever really consider what a thin shot is? It may seem obvious but I shall say it anyway, and that is that a thinned shot occurs when the golfer strikes the ball with the leading edge of the club.
 
Interestingly enough, many golfers that are prone to thinning their shots will instinctively de-loft the club to avoid the “leading-edge strike”, only to find that they still fail to get the desired ball-flight for reasons that are self-evident.
 
The “stinging” shot described above is, of course, an obvious example of hitting the ball thin, but what about the times when the vibration is not there, the golfer has not de-lofted the club but the flight of the ball is still lower than expected? This is still likely to be a consequence of “not getting all of the ball” which is what a marginally thinned shot is.
 
The ultimate aim is to strike the ball with the “sweet-spot” of the club because by doing so the golfer will achieve the optimum ball-flight, direction and distance assuming all other things – such as swing path, for example – are equal. The location of the sweet-spot may vary slightly from one set of irons to another but as a general rule is situated marginally towards the heel of the club and a little below halfway up the face; the sweet spot is never on the leading edge!
 
Taking all of the above into account, it may help to form a picture in our minds of the position of the leading edge of the club relative to the ball at the precise moment of impact of a slightly thinned shot. Having done so, mentally “freeze” the club in that position (with the leading edge just touching the bottom of the ball) and then, whilst it is there, bend the leading edge downwards so that it and the ball are no longer in contact. Having now moved the leading edge “out of the way”, re-start the golf club to complete the strike and you should “see” that it is now the club-face that hits the ball.
 
It follows, therefore, that for someone who is prone to thinning the ball and as a consequence fails to get it airborne, moving the leading edge “out of the way” by bending it downwards could help them to get the club face on the ball, thereby taking advantage of the available loft.
 
As with many things connected with golf club specification, however, the inter-relationship which exists between all aspects of the club means that moving the leading edge “out of the way” will impact on something else and in this case it is the loft. Bending the leading edge downwards – thereby reducing the distance between it and the ground (the sole angle or bounce) – will reduce the loft. Looking at it another way, reducing the loft of the club could help the “perpetual thinner” by getting the leading edge “out of the way” at the moment of impact. In any event, the effect on the loft is not great, given that a one degree reduction in bounce roughly equates to the same reduction in loft. Putting this into context, a seven iron, say, has a loft of around thirty-five degrees with about six degrees of bounce. Reducing the bounce by one degree (and I would not recommend much more – two degrees at a push, perhaps) will result in a new loft angle of thirty-four degrees.
 
In the right circumstances the trade-off is more than worth it because the better quality of strike can be such that the golfer’s game can improve beyond recognition without the need to change the golf swing.

Steve’s mission is to share the more “unusual” golf advice with his readers and has put together a complimentary report containing new and sometimes radical ideas and concepts that could take your game to a new level quickly and permanently. To access it instantly, please visit http://www.golfadvicedetective.com

Factors To Consider When Considering University Scholarship Deadlines

Scholarships are a vital factor, in enabling thousands of students to obtain a university education each year in the United Sates. They are awarded based on various factors which may include; financial hardship, academic performance, athletic ability, medical history or group affiliation, amongst others. You can scholarships apply for scholarships directly through your chosen university, through third parties, or directly to the scholarship provider themselves.

It is important to review all details all the scholarship that you intend to apply for, so that you can be certain that you meet the qualifying criteria. The key consideration should be the university scholarship deadlines. It is important the make your application as quickly as possible so that you don’t miss the deadlines. The deadlines can quite often differ from one scholarship to another, so be sure to check the specific dates of your chosen scholarships, so that you are not left disappointed.

University scholarship deadlines can vary, dependent on the university itself as well as the actual scholarship. Some deadlines may be November, others December, whilst others may allow you time until January or February. The important aspect is to understand when the deadline is, so that you don’t miss it. You should make sure you leave enough time to actually request the paperwork needed and time to complete the paperwork as well as gather any evidence or information required. This is in addition to the time taken to get the paperwork back to the scholarship provider.

You should also factor in time to obtain any letters of recommendation, as you may need to fit this around the free time of the teacher writing it for you.

It is highly advisable not to leave all of this to the last minute. You should allow 6-8 weeks to receive, complete and return all the relevant paperwork. Rushing just before the deadline is not the best way to go about obtaining a scholarship.

There are many organizations that can help with finding a scholarship; a cursory internet search will bring up a variety of options for you to look at. Your chosen university or universities should be able to give you more information regarding scholarships, especially if the application is going to be in relation to financial aid. The key point is to establish what information is needed by when, so that you don’t miss the university scholarship deadlines.