Tag Archives: Coaches

Soccer Coaching Skills – Top 5 Skills For Soccer Coaches

Soccer
by pbkwee

Coaches should be organized

Being an effective soccer coach requires a great deal of organization. Some clubs have team managers that handle scheduling games, referees and fields. In other organizations, all of this responsibility falls on the soccer coach. As many coaches have full-time jobs, being able to juggle their careers on and off the pitch is key.

As a coach, you need to be on time to your practices and have everything ready to go when your players arrive. A sloppy coach results in a sloppy team.

Coaches should be good communicators

It’s unavoidable, you will have to deal with the parents of the players. You can prevent a great number of problems before they happen by establishing an early line of communication with your parents. Make sure they have your email address and cell phone number so that you can be contacted.

It is also important that you have contact information for every player’s parents as well in case you need to address them outside of the field. I recommend creating some clear boundaries as to when you are willing to talk with the parents. They should respect your time and not hold you up every night after practice.

I also recommend a 24-hour cooling off period for parents before they can confront you after games. Letting cooler heads prevail can prevent hurt feelings and communication breakdowns.

Obviously, you have to be a skilled communicator with your players both in training and game situations. The good news is this is usually much easy than dealing with the parents.

Coaches should be a student of the game

No coach knows everything about every single aspect of soccer. However, the best coaches are constantly striving to learn more. They read books, watch coaching videos, attend seminars and talk with other coaches. Hopefully if you have coached for a long period of time you have a love for the game. If you are a new to soccer, it is my hope that you grow a passion for the beautiful game.

Either way, it is critical that you are always working to improve you coaching skills and knowledge.

Coaches should be good planners

This soccer coaching skill goes hand and hand with organization. Coaches should arrive to practice with a definite plan in mind. In addition, coaches should have an overall goal for the team. Each and every soccer practice should be building towards that goal.

If your main goal for the team is that they become fundamentally sound, then you should plan technical work in each session. If you want your players to know how to possess the ball for prolonged periods of time, then possession drills should make up the bulk of your practices. Players will need many repetitions in order to learn a new skill; one practice session isn’t going to cement a concept in place.

Coaches should be able to teach technique

This is a tricky coaching skill for some as not every coach is a former player. If you are unable to demonstrate proper technique to your players, it is critical that you find someone to help you that can.

Kids learn a great deal by modelling what they see. You don’t want them to pick up bad technique or habits from seeing improper demonstration.

Try to find an older player in the club or another coach to assist you with these demonstrations. Begin working on your own to improve your skills with the ball so that you can handle this in the future.

The ability to demonstrate proper technique is one of the most important soccer coaching skills that you can develop.

To learn more about the tools you need to become a better soccer coach, visit my soccer coaching skills blog.

You can get free access to my special report “3 Deadly Mistakes Soccer Coaches Make” at my website http://www.ultimatesoccercoaching.com.

Tips For Basketball Coaches

Basketball
by Mr ATM

Playing basketball, have you ever heard that “It doesn’t matter what offense you run, it’s how you run it that counts?”. Actually, I think it is totally false. It must be “Even though it does matter how you run your offense, what you run it is at least equally as important!”. Regardless of your coaching philosophy and goals, your choice of offense will be absolutely critical to your overall success.

 

Now I will be the first to admit that championships have been won on various levels by teams running the Flex, Triangle, Shuffle, Hi-Low, 5 Out Motion, Dribble Drive Motion, and undoubtedly dozens of other offenses. BUT, that doesn’t mean that a coach can just reach into a grab bag of offenses, pull one out, run it effectively, and win. Yet, year after year that is essentially what many coaches do, especially at the high school, middle school and club levels.

 

Even if their selection of an offense is not quite that random, there are always teams in every league and region that are running a particular offense because either their coach ran the same thing when he was in high school or because Duke, Carolina, Kansas, Kentucky, or another big name program runs it.

 

Before mentioning some things that you might want to consider when choosing an offense, let’s look at the real purpose of running an offense in the first place. Simply stated, running an offense should accomplish two things: 1.) Put your opponent at a defensive disadvantage so they end up fouling and sending your team to the free throw line and 2.) Generate open, makeable shots for your three best scorers.

 

With that in mind, here are five things to ask yourself when choosing an offense:

 

1. What is my #1 coaching priority and/or the coaching priority of my school? (Win games, develop players or a combination of both?)

 

2. What is the physical makeup and skill set level of my team and especially of my three best players? (Big, small, quick, slow, shooters, posts, slashers, drivers, etc).

 

3. What is the experience and basketball I.Q. of my team in general and especially of my three best players?

 

4. How does the physical makeup, skill level, experience, and basketball I.Q of my team compare to teams on my schedule? (We might be smaller or slower than in years past but still bigger or quicker than teams on our schedule.)

 

5. Where do my three best players shoot/score from most effectively? (Hubie Brown says that even NBA players will shoot better from one side of the floor than from the other and better from certain spots than others.)

 

6. Considering my staff and my available resources, what can I effectively teach?

 

Once you have the answers to those questions you can start weighing some of the many offensive options that are available. When looking at all the various offenses remember that college coaches generally recruit players who will fit into their already established system of play and so they may not have the same personnel limitations that you are facing. It might be more advantageous to seek out successful programs at your same level and see what they are running before making any definite decisions.

 

Regardless of which offense you decide to install it is absolutely imperative that you make the commitment to become an expert in that offense. You can’t effectively teach what you don’t know and understand yourself. Instructional DVDs, books, clinics, and articles are the most common methods of learning but don’t underestimate the value of getting out on the floor with your team and running through the offense yourself. I guarantee that actually running the offense yourself will help you discover insights to whatever offense you choose that you won’t be able to find any where else.

 

Finally, it’s important to know that all of today’s great and most popular offenses are basically “tweeked” versions of similar offenses that have been used for years. If something doesn’t fit your team’s personnel then change it! Carroll Williams did and came up with the Flex. Bobby Knight did and came up with Motion. Tex Winter did and came up with the Triangle. Vance Wahlberg did and his offense evolved into the Dribble Drive Motion Offense. Don’t be afraid to be creative – who knows what you might come up with!!

 

Dave Stricklin is a veteran basketball coach and writer for HoopSkills.com. Visit the website for more of his expert basketball instruction.

Soccer Golf – Great Soccer Drill For Coaches – Soccer Practice Activity to Improve Passing Accuracy

There are times during the season when it’s nice to change up the practice routine, put away the traditional drills, and have some fun while still working on some key skills. In this article, I will describe a great activity that combines soccer with golf.

Soccer Golf

Soccer golf is a great drill that will help players improve passing accuracy, touch, and leg strength.

To get started, you first want to select several objects to use as “holes” on your golf course. Objects can include things such as goal posts, trash cans, cones, light poles, trees, fences, and so on. You don’t need to limit yourself to the soccer field.

After you have determined your targets, you want to set up a course. You want to create holes of varying length and difficulty. Use your imagination and creativity. For example, I’ve made par 5 “doglegs” where players needed to chip the ball over a fence and navigate around a tree before reaching the target. I’ve had par 3 holes where players had to lob the ball over an imaginary lake before reaching the hole.

Now that you have the course set up, give the players a walk-through of each hole, explaining how they should proceed. You can also establish a par for each hole at this time depending on its length and difficulty. Pars in golf usually range from 3 to 5 strokes but your holes can be as long or as short as you want.

Once the players are familiar with the holes, have them proceed through the course. You can either have each player go individually or you can send them off in pairs, having them take turns on each shot. Each touch of the ball is worth a stroke and the players should keep track of their own scores.

This is a great activity that your players will really enjoy. My teams actually create their own score cards and players now have an active role in developing new holes and courses.

Soccer Golf is an activity that can be used at any point of a practice, but I find it works particularly well as a cool-down activity towards the end.

Perry is high-school soccer coach and former player. He writes on a variety of topics. Please see his websites Gas Powered RC Cars and Gas Powered RC Boats.

Soccer Coaching Skills – Top 5 Skills for Soccer Coaches

Coaches should be organized

Being an effective soccer coach requires a great deal of organization. Some clubs have team managers that handle scheduling games, referees and fields. In other organizations, all of this responsibility falls on the soccer coach. As many coaches have full-time jobs, being able to juggle their careers on and off the pitch is key.

As a coach, you need to be on time to your practices and have everything ready to go when your players arrive. A sloppy coach results in a sloppy team.

Coaches should be good communicators

It’s unavoidable, you will have to deal with the parents of the players. You can prevent a great number of problems before they happen by establishing an early line of communication with your parents. Make sure they have your email address and cell phone number so that you can be contacted.

It is also important that you have contact information for every player’s parents as well in case you need to address them outside of the field. I recommend creating some clear boundaries as to when you are willing to talk with the parents. They should respect your time and not hold you up every night after practice.

I also recommend a 24-hour cooling off period for parents before they can confront you after games. Letting cooler heads prevail can prevent hurt feelings and communication breakdowns.

Obviously, you have to be a skilled communicator with your players both in training and game situations. The good news is this is usually much easy than dealing with the parents.

Coaches should be a student of the game

No coach knows everything about every single aspect of soccer. However, the best coaches are constantly striving to learn more. They read books, watch coaching videos, attend seminars and talk with other coaches. Hopefully if you have coached for a long period of time you have a love for the game. If you are a new to soccer, it is my hope that you grow a passion for the beautiful game.

Either way, it is critical that you are always working to improve you coaching skills and knowledge.

Coaches should be good planners

This soccer coaching skill goes hand and hand with organization. Coaches should arrive to practice with a definite plan in mind. In addition, coaches should have an overall goal for the team. Each and every soccer practice should be building towards that goal.

If your main goal for the team is that they become fundamentally sound, then you should plan technical work in each session. If you want your players to know how to possess the ball for prolonged periods of time, then possession drills should make up the bulk of your practices. Players will need many repetitions in order to learn a new skill; one practice session isn’t going to cement a concept in place.

Coaches should be able to teach technique

This is a tricky coaching skill for some as not every coach is a former player. If you are unable to demonstrate proper technique to your players, it is critical that you find someone to help you that can.

Kids learn a great deal by modelling what they see. You don’t want them to pick up bad technique or habits from seeing improper demonstration.

Try to find an older player in the club or another coach to assist you with these demonstrations. Begin working on your own to improve your skills with the ball so that you can handle this in the future.

The ability to demonstrate proper technique is one of the most important soccer coaching skills that you can develop.

To learn more about the tools you need to become a better soccer coach, visit my soccer coaching skills blog.
You can get free access to my special report “3 Deadly Mistakes Soccer Coaches Make” at my website http://www.ultimatesoccercoaching.com.

Soccer Coaching Skills – Top 5 Skills For Soccer Coaches

Coaches should be organized

Being an effective soccer coach requires a great deal of organization. Some clubs have team managers that handle scheduling games, referees and fields. In other organizations, all of this responsibility falls on the soccer coach. As many coaches have full-time jobs, being able to juggle their careers on and off the pitch is key.

As a coach, you need to be on time to your practices and have everything ready to go when your players arrive. A sloppy coach results in a sloppy team.

Coaches should be good communicators

It’s unavoidable, you will have to deal with the parents of the players. You can prevent a great number of problems before they happen by establishing an early line of communication with your parents. Make sure they have your email address and cell phone number so that you can be contacted.

It is also important that you have contact information for every player’s parents as well in case you need to address them outside of the field. I recommend creating some clear boundaries as to when you are willing to talk with the parents. They should respect your time and not hold you up every night after practice.

I also recommend a 24-hour cooling off period for parents before they can confront you after games. Letting cooler heads prevail can prevent hurt feelings and communication breakdowns.

Obviously, you have to be a skilled communicator with your players both in training and game situations. The good news is this is usually much easy than dealing with the parents.

Coaches should be a student of the game

No coach knows everything about every single aspect of soccer. However, the best coaches are constantly striving to learn more. They read books, watch coaching videos, attend seminars and talk with other coaches. Hopefully if you have coached for a long period of time you have a love for the game. If you are a new to soccer, it is my hope that you grow a passion for the beautiful game.

Either way, it is critical that you are always working to improve you coaching skills and knowledge.

Coaches should be good planners

This soccer coaching skill goes hand and hand with organization. Coaches should arrive to practice with a definite plan in mind. In addition, coaches should have an overall goal for the team. Each and every soccer practice should be building towards that goal.

If your main goal for the team is that they become fundamentally sound, then you should plan technical work in each session. If you want your players to know how to possess the ball for prolonged periods of time, then possession drills should make up the bulk of your practices. Players will need many repetitions in order to learn a new skill; one practice session isn’t going to cement a concept in place.

Coaches should be able to teach technique

This is a tricky coaching skill for some as not every coach is a former player. If you are unable to demonstrate proper technique to your players, it is critical that you find someone to help you that can.

Kids learn a great deal by modelling what they see. You don’t want them to pick up bad technique or habits from seeing improper demonstration.

Try to find an older player in the club or another coach to assist you with these demonstrations. Begin working on your own to improve your skills with the ball so that you can handle this in the future.

The ability to demonstrate proper technique is one of the most important soccer coaching skills that you can develop.

To learn more about the tools you need to become a better soccer coach, visit my soccer coaching skills blog.

You can get free access to my special report “3 Deadly Mistakes Soccer Coaches Make” at my website http://www.ultimatesoccercoaching.com.

Tips For Basketball Coaches

Playing basketball, have you ever heard that “It doesn’t matter what offense you run, it’s how you run it that counts?”. Actually, I think it is totally false. It must be “Even though it does matter how you run your offense, what you run it is at least equally as important!”. Regardless of your coaching philosophy and goals, your choice of offense will be absolutely critical to your overall success.

 

Now I will be the first to admit that championships have been won on various levels by teams running the Flex, Triangle, Shuffle, Hi-Low, 5 Out Motion, Dribble Drive Motion, and undoubtedly dozens of other offenses. BUT, that doesn’t mean that a coach can just reach into a grab bag of offenses, pull one out, run it effectively, and win. Yet, year after year that is essentially what many coaches do, especially at the high school, middle school and club levels.

 

Even if their selection of an offense is not quite that random, there are always teams in every league and region that are running a particular offense because either their coach ran the same thing when he was in high school or because Duke, Carolina, Kansas, Kentucky, or another big name program runs it.

 

Before mentioning some things that you might want to consider when choosing an offense, let’s look at the real purpose of running an offense in the first place. Simply stated, running an offense should accomplish two things: 1.) Put your opponent at a defensive disadvantage so they end up fouling and sending your team to the free throw line and 2.) Generate open, makeable shots for your three best scorers.

 

With that in mind, here are five things to ask yourself when choosing an offense:

 

1.

What is my #1 coaching priority and/or the coaching priority of my school? (Win games, develop players or a combination of both?)

 

2. What is the physical makeup and skill set level of my team and especially of my three best players? (Big, small, quick, slow, shooters, posts, slashers, drivers, etc).

 

3. What is the experience and basketball I.Q. of my team in general and especially of my three best players?

 

4. How does the physical makeup, skill level, experience, and basketball I.Q of my team compare to teams on my schedule? (We might be smaller or slower than in years past but still bigger or quicker than teams on our schedule.)

 

5. Where do my three best players shoot/score from most effectively? (Hubie Brown says that even NBA players will shoot better from one side of the floor than from the other and better from certain spots than others.)

 

6. Considering my staff and my available resources, what can I effectively teach?

 

Once you have the answers to those questions you can start weighing some of the many offensive options that are available. When looking at all the various offenses remember that college coaches generally recruit players who will fit into their already established system of play and so they may not have the same personnel limitations that you are facing. It might be more advantageous to seek out successful programs at your same level and see what they are running before making any definite decisions.

 

Regardless of which offense you decide to install it is absolutely imperative that you make the commitment to become an expert in that offense. You can’t effectively teach what you don’t know and understand yourself. Instructional DVDs, books, clinics, and articles are the most common methods of learning but don’t underestimate the value of getting out on the floor with your team and running through the offense yourself. I guarantee that actually running the offense yourself will help you discover insights to whatever offense you choose that you won’t be able to find any where else.

 

Finally, it’s important to know that all of today’s great and most popular offenses are basically “tweeked” versions of similar offenses that have been used for years. If something doesn’t fit your team’s personnel then change it! Carroll Williams did and came up with the Flex. Bobby Knight did and came up with Motion. Tex Winter did and came up with the Triangle. Vance Wahlberg did and his offense evolved into the Dribble Drive Motion Offense. Don’t be afraid to be creative – who knows what you might come up with!!

 

Dave Stricklin is a veteran basketball coach and writer for HoopSkills.com. Visit the website for more of his expert basketball instruction.

Top Nfl Coaches Of All Time

The National Football League has seen some great coaches in it’s 90-plus year history. The league was formed in 1920, and the coach of one of it’s original franchises, George Halas of the Decatur Staleys, purchased the team in 1921, relocated the team to Chicago and renamed them the Chicago Bears in 1922. The team won the league championship in 1921, and was easily the dominant team during the early years of the league. For the next 40 years, Halas was the guiding force behind the team, leading them to six championships, the last in 1963. His all-time record, 324-151-31, ranks second for most victories.

The winningest all-time coach is Don Shula (347-173-6) who won two championships with the Miami Dolphins, and his 1972 team remains the only NFL team to complete an entire season with an undefeated record. Shula also holds the record for the most Super Bowl appearances by a coach with six. The league’s all-time winningest coach by percentage (.740) is the legendary Vince Lombardi, after whom the trophy awarded to the Super Bowl-winning team is named. Lombardi led the Green Bay Packers to the first two Super Bowl titles, and is considered one of the greatest motivators in NFL history. Chuck Noll of the Pittsburgh Steelers won four Super Bowl titles, the most of any coach. Noll’s prowess was on the defensive side of the ball, credited with developing the famed “Steel Curtain” defense of the late 1970’s. Three coaches, Bill Belichick, Joe Gibbs and Bill Walsh, each have three Super Bowl titles. Belichick is still active (New England), and is generally considered the best coach currently in the league. Gibbs led the Washington Redskins to three Super Bowl titles under three different quarterbacks. Walsh, the genius behind the potent West Coast offense, was considered perhaps the most innovative offensive coach of all time.

There are currently 22 coaches who’ve been elected to the NFL Hall of Fame, among them such legendary figures as George Allen, Paul Brown, Al Davis, Bud Grant, Tom Landry, John Madden, and Hank Stram. These coaches have a combined eight Super Bowl appearances among them, with four championships.

Retired coaches who probably will soon be enshrined into the Hall of Fame are such illustrious names as Tony Dungy, Bill Cowher and Dick Vermeil, each of whom led their teams to at least one Super Bowl championship.

Among the current crop of NFL coaches, several have shown enormous potential to one day be included in the conversation of the “best” coaches of all-time. Besides Belichick, they include Mike Tomlin of Pittsburgh, Lovie Smith of Chicago, Andy Reid of Philadelphia and Tom Coughlin of the New York Giants. Tomlin became the toungest head coach to win a Super Bowl in 2009.

Do you want to find out other interesting facts about NFL? If so then let me invite you to my NFL Info Guide website http://nflinfoguide.com