Tag Archives: Ball

To Hit the Golf Ball Better and Higher – Consider Reducing the Loft of Your Golf Clubs

At first sight this may seem to be a strange paradox; after all, in order to hit the ball higher the obvious thing to do outside of changing the golf swing would be to increase the loft, not decrease it. This may be the accepted wisdom of “usual” golf advice, but is it necessarily correct?
 
Let me explain.
 
When set correctly in preparation to strike the golf ball, the leading edge of all irons sits off the ground; the extent to which it does depends on the club, with the leading edge of the more lofted clubs sitting more off the ground than those with less loft.
 
The amount by which the leading edge is off the ground is the sole angle of the golf club, commonly known as “bounce”, so the sand wedge, for example, will have more bounce than, say, a six iron. As a comparison, the former may have 12 degrees of bounce against 5 degrees with the latter.
 
Wedges – particularly sand wedges – tend to be a law unto themselves and are, therefore, outside the scope of this article which focuses on the rest of the irons.
 
There may be a number of reasons for failing to get the ball airborne – de-lofting the club at impact for example – but one of the main causes is hitting the ball “thin”.
 
Everyone has at some point in their golfing life thinned a shot so badly that it skids along the ground, sending an unpleasant wave of stinging vibration up the shaft and into the hands; but does anyone ever really consider what a thin shot is? It may seem obvious but I shall say it anyway, and that is that a thinned shot occurs when the golfer strikes the ball with the leading edge of the club.
 
Interestingly enough, many golfers that are prone to thinning their shots will instinctively de-loft the club to avoid the “leading-edge strike”, only to find that they still fail to get the desired ball-flight for reasons that are self-evident.
 
The “stinging” shot described above is, of course, an obvious example of hitting the ball thin, but what about the times when the vibration is not there, the golfer has not de-lofted the club but the flight of the ball is still lower than expected? This is still likely to be a consequence of “not getting all of the ball” which is what a marginally thinned shot is.
 
The ultimate aim is to strike the ball with the “sweet-spot” of the club because by doing so the golfer will achieve the optimum ball-flight, direction and distance assuming all other things – such as swing path, for example – are equal. The location of the sweet-spot may vary slightly from one set of irons to another but as a general rule is situated marginally towards the heel of the club and a little below halfway up the face; the sweet spot is never on the leading edge!
 
Taking all of the above into account, it may help to form a picture in our minds of the position of the leading edge of the club relative to the ball at the precise moment of impact of a slightly thinned shot. Having done so, mentally “freeze” the club in that position (with the leading edge just touching the bottom of the ball) and then, whilst it is there, bend the leading edge downwards so that it and the ball are no longer in contact. Having now moved the leading edge “out of the way”, re-start the golf club to complete the strike and you should “see” that it is now the club-face that hits the ball.
 
It follows, therefore, that for someone who is prone to thinning the ball and as a consequence fails to get it airborne, moving the leading edge “out of the way” by bending it downwards could help them to get the club face on the ball, thereby taking advantage of the available loft.
 
As with many things connected with golf club specification, however, the inter-relationship which exists between all aspects of the club means that moving the leading edge “out of the way” will impact on something else and in this case it is the loft. Bending the leading edge downwards – thereby reducing the distance between it and the ground (the sole angle or bounce) – will reduce the loft. Looking at it another way, reducing the loft of the club could help the “perpetual thinner” by getting the leading edge “out of the way” at the moment of impact. In any event, the effect on the loft is not great, given that a one degree reduction in bounce roughly equates to the same reduction in loft. Putting this into context, a seven iron, say, has a loft of around thirty-five degrees with about six degrees of bounce. Reducing the bounce by one degree (and I would not recommend much more – two degrees at a push, perhaps) will result in a new loft angle of thirty-four degrees.
 
In the right circumstances the trade-off is more than worth it because the better quality of strike can be such that the golfer’s game can improve beyond recognition without the need to change the golf swing.

Steve’s mission is to share the more “unusual” golf advice with his readers and has put together a complimentary report containing new and sometimes radical ideas and concepts that could take your game to a new level quickly and permanently. To access it instantly, please visit http://www.golfadvicedetective.com

Coaching Soccer Ball Control Drills

Whether trying out or playing for a youth soccer club, ball control is critical to every position on the soccer field. Since it is such an important soccer skill, youth soccer players should practice the fundamentals of ball control over and over at an early age through soccer drills customized to improve your dribbling. A few youth soccer ball control drills are listed below but you can find many more free soccer ball control drills online at websites like Weplay.com.


A team without effective ball control will have problems attacking, counterattacking, and ultimately, winning youth soccer games. Crisp passes, clean receiving, controlled dribbling, and moving the ball towards the opposing goal will allow teams to consistently set up scoring opportunities. Every soccer practice should involve ball control drills until it becomes second nature to young players.

Ball Control Drills for Youth Soccer Players


These ball control drills are not only effective for acquiring this mandatory skill, they will also add to the enjoyment of a soccer practice. The players will develop skills in dribbling, passing, receiving, positioning, and trapping.


Knockout Drill – The objective of this game is to develop the players’ ability to manipulate the ball and keep it under control. Have all players dribble their soccer balls while trying to knock other player’s balls outside of the grid.


Man-in-the-Middle (aka Pig-in-the-Middle) – Break the players up into teams of three with one soccer ball per team. One player starts out in the middle as a defensive player while the other two take up positions across from each other. The two offensive players must pass the ball back and forth without the defensive player gaining control of the ball. If the defensive player succeeds in trapping the soccer ball, they switch places with the player who passed it. The offensive skills acquired by youth soccer players are 1) making crisp, accurate passes 2) receiving the ball cleanly and in control. The defensive soccer player will learn to 1) position themselves effectively 2) become efficient at trapping the ball.

By establishing effective ball control in soccer games, you’ll be able to consistently put yourself into a position to win. The opposing team can’t score while you are in possession and is bound to make a mistake in trying to gain control. That’s when you strike.

By Trevor A. Sumner who works for Weplay.com, a youth soccer community dedicated to providing parents, coaches and athletes the tools and information to celebrate the love of the game. Weplay.com has one of the most comprehensive, free soccer drill libraries in its active soccer community.

Lacrosse Ball Passing

Over the years Lacrosse has been becoming an increasingly more popular sport across America. However, I feel like people aren’t getting a good understanding of the sports basics before they hit the field. So I thought I would do something about that, thus this article. I just wanted to go over some basics so people would stop making fools of them.

 

Lacrosse has been popular on the east coast for many years, and has slowly made its way across America and has become popular all over the states. Over the last several years there has been a huge jump in the number of people playing lacrosse. From the west to the east and everywhere in between lacrosse seems to be popping up everywhere.

 

Just like every other sports every person needs to have a strong understanding for the sport and all its fundamentals. Let’s start off with the real basics and that all begins with simple passing of the lacrosse ball.

 

Proper handling of a Lacrosse stick is the first thing that one must learn.  Watching lacrosse players play will help you understand that the throwing motion should be fluid and will often have to take place on the run.

 

When running you will also have to make sure that you can cradle the ball through instinct or muscle memory.  This can take some time and is definitely a skill that you will have to start cultivating.

 

As you hold the lacrosse stick you will want to make sure that the stick is across your body.  The pocket should be near your ear and you want to make sure that your top hand is holding the equipment right above your shoulder.

 

Your opposite hand will be at the bottom of the stick.  The order of your hands will depend on which hand is your dominant hand and you should be sure that you understand in what order to hold your hands.

 

Your feet should never be even with each other when you are throwing a lacrosse body.  You should make sure that your feet are staggered so that you are able to put more power into the throw and you are also able to have the balance that you need for the throw.

 

When you are throwing the ball you will have to move your body to transfer the weight from your back foot to your front.  This transition of weight and the momentum that you are using to push the ball forward will help you have a lot of force behind your throw.

Cade Lennox is a fitness and health expert who writes articles about exercise, nutrition and more. He has also authored hundreds of treadmill reviews and treadmill ratings.

How to Choose the Right Bowling Ball

How to choose the right bowling ball is the first important decision you will make at the bowling center. Even a certain guy from Bedrock named Flintstone had to choose the right bowling ball, although his choices were stone or…stone. Nevertheless, he picked the rock that fit his game the best. As a matter of fact, bowling historians believe that stone was actually the first material used for bowling balls about 5000 years ago. When bowling finally moved indoors in the 1800’s, wooden bowling balls were all the rage. Then, throughout much of the 20th century, most bowling balls were made of hard rubber. Choosing the right bowling ball during each of these periods wasn’t too difficult; pick the appropriate weight and ensure the finger holes fit right-done.  

Technology has had a dramatic effect on the game of bowling. Electronic scoring systems, lanes made of synthetic materials, and bowling balls made of various materials to react differently to varying lane conditions. Fortunately, if you only bowl a few times a year and you’re not interested in buying your own bowling ball, figuring out how to choose the right bowling ball from the selection of “house” balls  can be very easy. Actually, as compared the rubber bowling ball era, there is only one additional consideration, but I’ll get into that after discussing weight and fit.

First, how heavy should the ball be? Well, a pretty good rule of thumb to follow is one pound of bowling ball for every 10 pounds of body weight. So, if your first time bowling child weighs 80 pounds, start with an eight pound ball. From there, you will have to watch and make a judgment as to whether they seem to be able to physically handle that weight. If he/she seems to be able to swing the ball comfortably, without losing balance, that is probably to right weight to go with. Most bowling centers have balls from 6-16 lbs. in one pound increments; the weight of the ball is usually engraved on the surface of the ball. So if you need to adjust, you can go up or down by ones until you find the right weight.

Second, how should the holes fit my fingers? Simply stated-comfortably. More specifically, not too loose or too tight. You shouldn’t have to worry about the ball falling off of your hand or any of your fingers getting stuck during delivery. Most house balls are drilled for the thumb to go all the way in to the ball and for the ring and middle fingers to go in to the second knuckle. Another fit factor is how the ball “sits” in your hand. With your fingers and thumb in the ball as explained above, the ball should lay in your palm making full contact.

Now for the mystery third consideration when choosing the right bowling ball. This applies especially to those who choose to buy their own bowling ball. Back in the rubber ball day, there was only one color to choose from, black. Now there are so many different colors and patterns to choose from you can find a bowling ball that suits your personality. Whether it’s your favorite color, has your favorite sports team logo on it, or it looks like you’re bowling with a giant golf ball; the choices can really make it fun to go out and buy a new ball.

So now that you’re practically an expert on how to choose the right bowling ball, let’s do a quick review. Go to the bowling center; start with a ball that is one pound for each ten pounds of your body weight. Ensure your hand fits in the ball comfortably, fingers snug enough to not drop the ball and not so tight that you can’t let it go. Most importantly, go out on the lanes and have a great time!!

How to Choose a Ten Pin Bowling Ball

I think its safe to assume that if you are reading this then you probably want to buy a bowling ball. It could be because you want to improve your bowling game and take it to the next level. Or it could simply be you don’t like using the balls at your local bowling alley or can’t find the right one for you. Also, how do you choose a tenpin bowling ball that is right for you?

When you buy a ball, make sure your ball is the right weight for you, the finger holes will be spaced and sized according to your fingers. This can improve your bowling game and help reduce the chance of you getting blisters or strained tendons whilst bowling. But how do you choose a tenpin bowling ball for you?

Well, there are many things you need to take into consideration when you choose one. Your weight is one factor, your ball should be more or less 10% of your body weight. Having said this it is not uncommon for bowlers to choose the heaviest ball that they can comfortably play ten pin bowling with. But be cautious! Playing with a ball too heavy for you will surely result in injury. Also, how experienced a bowler you are and your playing style are the key factors when you choose a ball.

When you buy one, there is a vast array of bowling balls to choose from but they can be broadly split into four categories: plastic or polyester balls, urethane balls, balls made from reactive resin and particle balls, a combination of urethane and resin.

So how do you choose one for you? How much you spend when you buy a ball depends largely on your motivation for wanting it in the first place, what results you want from your ball and, of course, there is your budget to consider.

If you are just starting to play tenpin bowling, a plastic or polyester ball is probably the best choice when you first buy a bowling ball. These balls are very hard-wearing and this is why you can find them at your nearest bowling alley. They are easy to control and bowl accurately which is why they are great for straight shots or spares. A beginner ball usually costs between $ 50-$ 100.

For intermediate bowlers a urethane ball may be the right choice. These typically cost $ 100 – $ 150. Urethane balls have a higher friction surface and are better for hooking.

If you have a lot of experience playing tenpin bowling and have done your fair share of hooking, you may want to buy a particle or resin ball. Advanced bowlers like this type of ball because of its increased skid and powerful striking power. These can cost anywhere between $ 100 – $ 275.

Some of the biggest brands of bowling balls are; Elite, Brunswick, Morich, Ebonite, AMF, Hammer and Storm.

If you want more information on how to choose a tenpin bowling ball for you and improve your bowling game, click the following link: buy a bowling ball

To Hit the Golf Ball Better and Higher – Consider Reducing the Loft of Your Golf Clubs

At first sight this may seem to be a strange paradox; after all, in order to hit the ball higher the obvious thing to do outside of changing the golf swing would be to increase the loft, not decrease it. This may be the accepted wisdom of “usual” golf advice, but is it necessarily correct?
 
Let me explain.
 
When set correctly in preparation to strike the golf ball, the leading edge of all irons sits off the ground; the extent to which it does depends on the club, with the leading edge of the more lofted clubs sitting more off the ground than those with less loft.
 
The amount by which the leading edge is off the ground is the sole angle of the golf club, commonly known as “bounce”, so the sand wedge, for example, will have more bounce than, say, a six iron. As a comparison, the former may have 12 degrees of bounce against 5 degrees with the latter.
 
Wedges – particularly sand wedges – tend to be a law unto themselves and are, therefore, outside the scope of this article which focuses on the rest of the irons.
 
There may be a number of reasons for failing to get the ball airborne – de-lofting the club at impact for example – but one of the main causes is hitting the ball “thin”.
 
Everyone has at some point in their golfing life thinned a shot so badly that it skids along the ground, sending an unpleasant wave of stinging vibration up the shaft and into the hands; but does anyone ever really consider what a thin shot is? It may seem obvious but I shall say it anyway, and that is that a thinned shot occurs when the golfer strikes the ball with the leading edge of the club.
 
Interestingly enough, many golfers that are prone to thinning their shots will instinctively de-loft the club to avoid the “leading-edge strike”, only to find that they still fail to get the desired ball-flight for reasons that are self-evident.
 
The “stinging” shot described above is, of course, an obvious example of hitting the ball thin, but what about the times when the vibration is not there, the golfer has not de-lofted the club but the flight of the ball is still lower than expected? This is still likely to be a consequence of “not getting all of the ball” which is what a marginally thinned shot is.
 
The ultimate aim is to strike the ball with the “sweet-spot” of the club because by doing so the golfer will achieve the optimum ball-flight, direction and distance assuming all other things – such as swing path, for example – are equal. The location of the sweet-spot may vary slightly from one set of irons to another but as a general rule is situated marginally towards the heel of the club and a little below halfway up the face; the sweet spot is never on the leading edge!
 
Taking all of the above into account, it may help to form a picture in our minds of the position of the leading edge of the club relative to the ball at the precise moment of impact of a slightly thinned shot. Having done so, mentally “freeze” the club in that position (with the leading edge just touching the bottom of the ball) and then, whilst it is there, bend the leading edge downwards so that it and the ball are no longer in contact. Having now moved the leading edge “out of the way”, re-start the golf club to complete the strike and you should “see” that it is now the club-face that hits the ball.
 
It follows, therefore, that for someone who is prone to thinning the ball and as a consequence fails to get it airborne, moving the leading edge “out of the way” by bending it downwards could help them to get the club face on the ball, thereby taking advantage of the available loft.
 
As with many things connected with golf club specification, however, the inter-relationship which exists between all aspects of the club means that moving the leading edge “out of the way” will impact on something else and in this case it is the loft. Bending the leading edge downwards – thereby reducing the distance between it and the ground (the sole angle or bounce) – will reduce the loft. Looking at it another way, reducing the loft of the club could help the “perpetual thinner” by getting the leading edge “out of the way” at the moment of impact. In any event, the effect on the loft is not great, given that a one degree reduction in bounce roughly equates to the same reduction in loft. Putting this into context, a seven iron, say, has a loft of around thirty-five degrees with about six degrees of bounce. Reducing the bounce by one degree (and I would not recommend much more – two degrees at a push, perhaps) will result in a new loft angle of thirty-four degrees.
 
In the right circumstances the trade-off is more than worth it because the better quality of strike can be such that the golfer’s game can improve beyond recognition without the need to change the golf swing.

Steve’s mission is to share the more “unusual” golf advice with his readers and has put together a complimentary report containing new and sometimes radical ideas and concepts that could take your game to a new level quickly and permanently. To access it instantly, please visit http://www.golfadvicedetective.com

How to Aim a Bowling Ball – Bowling Tips For Beginners

Are you an occasional bowler who, although you enjoy bowling, gets a bit frustrated because your scores usually, well how can I say this delicately… stink? Do you find that you can’t seem to consistently hit the head pin with the first ball? Help has finally arrived-simple steps to take to keep your bowling ball on target.

How to aim a bowling ball-that’s a question that experienced bowlers occasionally have a hard time answering. Their problems are usually much more technical than the advice in this article can fix. Here, we will discuss the basics of how to aim a bowling ball with the intent of raising your scores. These techniques are not difficult; they just take time and practice to master.

Recreational bowlers usually start off with aiming at the pins. I absolutely agree with the logic; see target-hit target. But there is actually a better way (for most) that can really improve your success on the lanes.

When you stand on the approach ready to begin your shot, look down the lane, you will notice a variety of markings. About 15 feet from the foul line there’s a series of arrows that point toward the pins. Many bowlers aim for these arrows rather than the pins when bowling. Why? Simply stated, it is easier to hit a target that is closer to you. So, as you bowl, make sure you are standing in the same position to start each time and watch your ball roll over the arrows.  Experiment aiming at different arrows until you hit around the head pin consistently. When that occurs, make a mental note of where you were standing and which arrow you rolled the ball over. This is what is referred to as your “mark”.  Beginners should practice this method with the first ball of each frame first; it gets a bit more technical when trying to get spares–that’s another article.  

I realize that this may sound a bit complicated, however with a little practice; you will find that it gives you a solid foundation to work from. You will soon begin scoring higher more consistently; and maybe even having just a little more fun on the lanes. After all, that’s really what it’s all about, going to the lanes and having a great time!

Bowl a Strike – How to Spin a Bowling Ball

Learning how to spin a bowling ball correctly will surely improve your bowling game and have you bowl a strike in no time. If you are often left feeling disappointed at your bowling score, feel something is missing from your game or simply feel ready to take your bowling technique to the next level, keep reading for bowling tips.

Ten pin bowling pins are actually 12″ apart so when you bowl a strike you need to cause the pins to knock each other over. Learning how to spin a bowling ball, instead of throwing it straight causes the pins to behave more destructively upon impact, knocking each other over in the process and earning you a strike. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as it looks to spin the ball and bowl a strike ! However, there are a few bowling tips which will help you to spin the ball.

Having the right type of bowling ball is going to help you alot if you want to bowl a strike more often as some bowling balls are better for spinning than others. The plastic balls which you find at your bowling alley are excellent for straight shots and therefore not really suited to spinning (or hooking as it is called). Bowling balls made from urethane have a better hook or spin. Professional bowlers prefer to use particle balls, this gives them increased control over the spin.

To spin the bowling ball properly and improve your bowling game, you want only your fingertips in the bowling ball not your whole fingers. Otherwise, if you try to spin the bowling ball your fingers may be rolling down the lane too. Buying your own bowling ball that is custom-built for your fingers will also help.

The next thing you need to do to learn how to spin a bowling ball properly is concentrate on your form. Keep in mind that the ideal point of impact is the “pocket” between the first pin and the third pin (the front pin and the one directly behind it to the right).

If you are right-handed then you will want to aim for the second triangle marker from the right (the opposite if your left-handed) You may find you veer naturally to one way or another so keep experimenting to see what works for you. Once you know what positioning is best you need to practice releasing the ball in this way every time to bowl a strike.

To spin the bowling ball, hold the ball with your hand underneath and your thumb on top as you approach the line and before you release the ball, twist your wrist so your hand is near the top of the ball and your thumb at the bottom. So, if you are right-handed this will mean you are turning your hand to the left. Remember, by aiming the ball for the second marker from the right will accommodate for the distance the ball will spin to the left. With a bit of luck and a lot of practice, your ball should spin into “the pocket” and earn you a strike!

For even more information on how to spin a bowling ball and other bowling tips to improve your guide click on the following link: how to spin a bowling ball.

A Brief History of Bowling, and the Bowling Ball

Bowling has been around forever, or so it seems, dating as far back as the year 3200 BC.  It appears that the Egyptians had developed a crude version of the modern game, as discovered by the British anthropologist Sir Flinders Petrie in the 1930’s, when he and his team of archaeologists uncovered all types of primitive bowling artifacts in the grave of a young boy.  And variations of the game can be traced all around the world, from Germany, to ancient Rome.  Who knows, maybe Jesus and the disciples even threw a few balls down the lanes in an attempt to convert a few souls.  This is purely hypothetical mind you.  

Yes, bowling has come a long way since the time of the pyramids.  It is now organized, with agreed-upon standards.  In 1952 the American Machine and Foundry Company or AMF entered the arena and started producing the first pinspotters.  This was great for business; however “pinboys” the world over were forced into the unemployment lines, a sad day indeed. Television helped grow the games popularity exponentially, when it first began airing the sport back in the 50’s.  Today bowling is enjoyed in over 90 countries, and by over 95 million people.

Yes the game has certainly been around the block, and has definitely undergone some changes. However the most notable change is in regards to the advancements made in ball technology.  Certainly the balls unearthed in Egypt all those years ago resembled little of the balls of today.  

They say that the first bowling balls were made from wood, though I beg to differ, because if my memory serves me correctly, I remember Fred Flintstone throwing a stone bowling ball.  Regardless, eventually the stone version gave way to the wood version, and wood stepped aside for a rubber type.  In fact, rubber balls reined supreme until about the 70’s when rubber gave way to polyester.  Not only were the bowlers wearing polyester suits, they were throwing matching bowling balls as well.  Well much like the suites, the polyester balls died out (but not completely), and urethane balls were all the rave.  But the biggest changes to the bowling ball were yet to come.

In the 90’s ball manufacturers began to experiment with ball cores.  The different shapes of these cores have a dramatic impact on the way the ball performs.  The balls surface, or better known as “coverstock” also went through some dramatic changes.  Currently manufacturers use polyester, which is a less expensive material, and produces the least amount of hook on the ball.  This lack of hook is because the polyester material doesn’t absorb as much of the oil from the lane surface.  The next material which is more costly than the previous is urethane balls.  They deliver a greater degree of hooking action, and require less maintenance.  The top dog or ball in this instance is the reactive urethane balls. They offer the greatest degree of hooking capabilities, and retain more power through the pin heads, which is an important factor if you’re into knocking down pins.

With all of the advancements being made, bowling ball manufacturers are forced to release new bowling ball as frequently as possible just to keep up with the competition.  This is because computers make it much easier to design new ball cores and make slight changes to a ball, allowing for customization within the ball industry.

There is one company that has been leading the charge in high-end, high-performance, ball innovation, and that’s Storm Products Inc.  They have really been the driving force behind many of the new advancements that have been made.  Because of this they are the world leaders in the bowling ball industry, and by default, offer a wide range of high-performance balls.  If you’re looking to invest in your first new bowling ball, or just want to add another to your collection, I would encourage you to check out Storm’s line of bowling balls, I’m certain you’ll be glad you did.

Larry Allen is a sports fan/borderline fanatic, and loves participating in sports of all types. Recently he has taken an interest in bowling, and learning all about it, what he learns, he loves to share. So you can take look at his latest website Storm Bowling Balls, where he provides you with several unbiased product reviews on Storm’s line of bowling balls, such as the Anarchy and the Prodigy.

Super Ball Piston Motor; Potentially Fuel-Less and Pollution Free

Some concepts reviewed at the Online Think Tank are way out there, yet some indeed have merit. Take for instance a recent brilliant idea, which Richard Walker came up with; A Super Ball Piston Motor that would infact be Fuel-Less and Pollution Free.

Worried about Global Warming? Don’t be, all be right back after these messages to explain the whole thing. Thank you for listening and Yes, I like the super ball piston idea, I can imagine it perfectly actually. Sounds very cool. The Super Balls will be the pistons, and once started they will continue to bounce inside, probably fired by air is that correct?

“Yes, this is one way the system can fire itself up”

Now in your super ball piston, as I understand the super ball it gets its elastiticity from sending its energy all the way thru, like a golf ball elongates when you hit it? But if you put a crankshaft thru the center, the balls elastic energy would hit the center where the crank shaft was. So instead the crank shaft would have to attach to the edge of the ball on each side or something.

“Indeed, this is one possibility and there are others of course, the possibilities are endless”

Well, I guess it would depend on how many cylinders, it could operate as one. Could just be two and then the cam shaft or crank shaft would attach on the side of the super balls and run between them. If they operated together with a bar between then the crack shaft could be on the bar or the bar itself right?

Or with a one cylinder super ball model the camshaft could be a “U” like bicycle forks where the cylinder was in the center. All this is in fact possible isn’t it Mr. Walker?

“Indeed it is and the sooner we build these pollution free motors the better, as the applications for such a motor are truly endless”

I certainly hope this article is of interest and that is has propelled thought. The goal is simple; to help you in your quest to be the best in 2007. I thank you for reading my many articles on diverse subjects, which interest you.

“Lance Winslow” – Online Think Tank forum board. If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/. Lance is an online writer in retirement.